Home Page English Spanish
Auto Insurance Other Insurance Business Insurance Life Insurance Homeowners Insurance

Frequently Asked Questions

Below are some of our frequently asked questions. If you have any other questions or concerns, please feel free to contact us.

  1. If I let someone borrow my car and they are in an accident, whose (if any) insurance will apply?
  2. If my child goes away to college with one of mom or dad's cars, are they still covered under my Personal Auto Policy?
  3. My teenager is approaching driving age. How can I cover him without breaking the bank?
  4. I just bought a new car and have yet to tell my insurance company. Am I still covered?
  5. My family is preparing for vacation and will be renting a car. Will my auto insurance apply?
  6. How do "points" affect car insurance rates, and when do insurance companies check driving records?
  7. I heard that some companies cancel people's auto insurance if they have just one claim. Is this true?
  8. Should I buy Uninsured Motorists coverage? And Underinsured Motorists coverage?
  9. Is my credit history important when I get a quote?
  10. Why do auto insurance applications include questions asking for credit information?
  11. What is an SR-22 Financial Responsibility filing?
  12. How can I get a quote for auto insurance?
  13. What if I have to many tickets or accidents?
If I let someone borrow my car and they are in an accident, whose (if any) insurance will apply?
A good rule of thumb: "Liability follows the car." In most cases, the insurance on the vehicle will apply if the accident is sustained while the vehicle is being driven by someone with permission. In many cases, the liability insurance of the person driving the car will pay if the amount of the loss exhausts your policy's limits

Back to Top

If my child goes away to college with one of mom or dad's cars, are they still covered under my Personal Auto Policy?
This is a very common scenario and may be viewed differently by different insurance companies. You should contact your insurance company and make sure the child is properly listed as a driver in order to avoid any future coverage disputes or prorated premium changes.

Back to Top

My teenager is approaching driving age. How can I cover him without breaking the bank?
Drivers under 25 pose the greatest risk of causing an accident. It is difficult to add someone in this age group to your auto insurance without seeing a major premium change. Keep in mind that it is more expensive to insure a teen if the only car(s) on the policy are a sports car, SUV, or other more valuable, attractive, expensive-to-repair vehicle. Consider purchasing a lower-end vehicle for your teen to drive and insure it separately in his name.

Back to Top

I just bought a new car and have yet to tell my insurance company. Am I still covered?
Coverage may apply for newly acquired vehicles, but you should notify your insurance company immediately. Most companies have strict limitations on the types of vehicles to which coverage will apply, the type of coverage that will apply and the amount of time that may lapse before coverage will not apply

Back to Top

My family is preparing for vacation and will be renting a car. Will my auto insurance apply?
Many auto insurance companies will extend liability coverage to a non-owned vehicle when rented for personal use. However, restrictions may apply. Similarly, there may be restrictions to the coverage offered by the rental car company. Before taking your next trip, contact your insurance company to ensure that a restriction does not ruin your family vacation.

Back to Top

How do "points" affect car insurance rates, and when do insurance companies check driving records?

In most states, the motor vehicles department has a "point" system, which is used to track accidents and violations that affect your driving record. Insurance companies will order a copy of your driving history once you have purchased a policy, in order to confirm the information that you provided on the application. Your company may also check your driving record when your policy is scheduled for renewal.

Each insurance company has its own method of evaluating applicants, so the points on your driving record may or may not have a direct impact on the rates you pay for auto insurance. And, you should know that only "moving violations" will affect your insurance rates. Parking tickets and other non-moving violations are not used by insurance companies.

If a review of your driving record uncovers negative information, there's a chance your insurance rates will increase. Insurers typically use their own "point" system to determine the amount of the increase (if any).



Back to Top

I heard that some companies cancel people's auto insurance if they have just one claim. Is this true?

Actually, it's very unlikely that any type of insurance would be canceled after you file a single claim. However, filing a claim could increase your premium on certain types of insurance.

For example, your auto insurance premium will almost certainly increase after an accident, especially if you're at fault. The reason for this is simple: statistical evidence indicates that people who have had accidents in the past are more likely to have accidents again in the future. This means the insurance company could see another claim from you someday, so there is a logical reason to charge you more for insurance coverage. Some states don't allow insurers to raise rates after a single not-at-fault accident, however.

The big question is how much your premium will increase. This is more difficult to anticipate, because insurance companies can use different formulas to calculate rate increases. In most cases, your auto insurance policy will not be canceled unless you have a certain number of at-fault accidents within a given period (e.g., two or three in one year).



Back to Top

Should I buy Uninsured Motorists coverage? And Underinsured Motorists coverage?
While these are optional coverages in most states, it's a good idea to buy them. Here's why. If you are injured as a result of an accident caused by a driver who does not have insurance, Uninsured Motorists (UM) coverage will pay for your medical and hospital bills and other related expenses. If you have health insurance, some of these expenses may be covered, but you would still be responsible for deductibles and co-payments. And, of course, if you have no health insurance coverage or have selected a high deductible plan (also called catastrophic health insurance), you will be responsible for all or most of your expenses.Underinsured Motorists (UIM) Coverage works the same way. If you are injured by a driver who has insurance, but your injuries are greater than the amount of insurance they purchased, your own policy will pay your unpaid medical bills up to the amount of UIM coverage you chose to purchase (minus the amount the other driver's insurance pays).In some states, there is also a coverage called Uninsured Motorists Property Damage (UMPD) coverage. This coverage pays for your car if it's damaged by an uninsured driver and you have not purchased Collision coverage for your own car

Back to Top

Is my credit history important when I get a quote?
In states where it's allowed, most companies collect information from consumer reporting agencies about your driving record, claims experience and credit history in order to offer you a rate that matches your experience. The companies we work with don't look at your credit score, but they do calculate an insurance score based on payment and credit history. Research shows that drivers with better insurance scores have fewer losses, so their rates are lower. But, this is only one of more than 50 variables that are considered by companies when offering you a quote

Back to Top

Why do auto insurance applications include questions asking for credit information?
A person's financial responsibility simply reflects the way they pay their bills. Studies indicate that financial responsibility is a good predictor of future insurance claims. This means that, by using financial responsibility when evaluating applications, insurance companies are able to more accurately understand the risk involved.When our partner insurance companies use financial responsibility, they don't actually look at the credit report. They are only concerned with the financial responsibility grouping that the customer falls into based on the information collected by the credit reporting service. The insurance companies' rating software interprets the information and reflects it in the rate offered. The rating goes on behind the scenes and the system does all the work.Here are some facts about the use of credit by insurance companies in general.It is estimated that over 90% of insurance companies use credit/financial responsibility when evaluating applications.Credit is merely one of the factors that companies look at when evaluating applications. Others include driving history, years of driving experience, and the type of vehicle.Insurance company queries are counted as "soft hits," and will have no impact on your credit score


Back to Top

What is an SR-22 Financial Responsibility filing?
An SR-22 filing is a car insurance form, required by many state Departments of Motor Vehicles (DMV) in certain situations, that provides proof of state-mandated liability insurance.Often, a DMV will require an SR-22 form to be filed when a driver is caught without insurance after an accident, or for a serious traffic offense such as a DUI. The driver usually must have an insurance company licensed in their state file an SR-22 on their behalf before they can reinstate their license or register their car. The insurance company must notify the DMV if the policy lapses or is terminated for any reason. If it is, the license of a driver will usually be suspended until they can provide proof of insurance that complies with the SR-22 requirements. In most states, the driver must maintain an SR-22 for a certain period (usually three years) from the end of license suspension or revocation.In addition, many states require you to fulfill the requirements of the SR-22 even if you move to a different state. The minimum liability limits of the state requiring the SR-22 may also be kept in force for your new insurance in this situation.Not all insurance companies offer to file SR-22 forms, although many do

Back to Top

How can I get a quote for auto insurance?
Call 713-789-2886 or visit this website anytime

Back to Top

What if I have to many tickets or accidents?
We have more than 20 companies to consider taking you on. If the big named companies have turned you down; you have come to the right company. That won't be a problem.

Back to Top

Home Page About Us Carriers Get A Quote Refer A Friend Contact Us Like Us on Facebook Follow Us on Twitter Connect on LinkedIn Insurance Website Templates by Insurance Website Builder